Volunteers

A conversation with Amanda Barber: Nature, Wildlife Recording & the City Nature Challenge

Kingfisher Sankey Valley Canal Amanda Barber

Last month the results of this year's City Nature Challenge were released. Our very own local naturalist and keen wildlife photographer, Amanda Barber, came 1st in the UK and 4th in the WORLD for the number of wildlife observations made over the 4 days. Amanda is still fairly new to biological recording and a self-confessed 'generalist'. We thought it would be a good idea to catch-up with Amanda after the event to share her story!

Wetland creation at Croxteth Country Park

Wetland creation Croxteth Park, Mersey Rivers Trust

Great to see more wetland creation work being undertaken in our local area, this time at Croxteth Country Park!

The Wetlands at Croxteth Park is part of the wider Upper Alt Misconnections currently being undertaken by Mersey Rivers Trust and Croxteth Park Volunteer Group (CPVG). 

The purpose of the wetland creation is to improve water quality, reduce flood risk and provide habitat for wildlife.

Dragonflies & Damselflies of North Merseyside by Steve White

Male Small Red-eyed Damselfy, Lee Park Golf Course by Steve Young

North Merseyside has a rich variety of wetland habitats suitable for dragonflies and damselflies, ranging from garden ponds to rivers, canals and streams and several large nature reserves. It also has a large and increasing number of dragonfly recorders and we currently hold almost 11,000 records – probably more than for any other group of insects. Twenty-four different species have so far been seen in the area. We are looking to gather as many records as possible during 2021!

Spiky bog-moss record by Dan Foy

 Zoomed in image of the spiky bog-moss (Sphagnum squarrosum)

All records of Sphagnum in the Merseyside area are rare and indeed very noteworthy, so to find this was a real pleasure, however, Sphagnum squarrosum is a real treat! The species was thought to be extinct in Merseyside; and according to the BBS database, the last known records (located around Formby area) were pre-1950! It just goes to show that there is always something good to be found if you look hard enough!

Survey of UK's coast highlights change in wintering waterbird populations

Turnstone by Sarah Kelman

The findings from a survey of the wintering waterbirds on the UK's non-estuarine coast, delivered by a network of volunteer observers, has revealed significant changes in the numbers of several waterbird species, including Lapwing, Curlew, Redshank, Turnstone, and Sanderling. 

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