• We collect information on all wildlife from Deer to Damselflies. Orchids to Bryophytes! If you have questions or doubts just get in touch!
  • To help us understand, monitor and conserve wildlife we occasionally run recording projects ourselves or with partners. Help us by getting involved.

  • In order to protect our local wildlife we need to be able to understand how it uses the landscape and green spaces. We need your help to do this.

  • Recording wildlife helps to inform future plans and City Region development. Highlighting areas for existing wildlife and opportunities for new connected habitat. See the LCR Ecological Network: http://www.lcreconet.uk
  • Urban Local Wildlife Sites (LWS) are essential to protecting and conserving the wildlife of Merseyside. Requests for information on North Merseyside LWS are free of charge.

  • Dragonflies and Damselflies are considered local priority species in North Merseyside as part of the NMBAP. Such Species and Habitats have conservation action plans which can be found here www.merseysidebiodiversity.org.uk
  • The Slender groundhopper (Tetrix subulata) is now thought to be a permenant resident and could be expanding its range. Your wildlife sightings can help us monitor changes in species distribution.

  • North Merseyside is home to an amazing combination of wildlife and wildplaces. From the internationally recognised Sefton Coast to the urban parks of Liverpool.

Volunteer

Volunteer

Everything we do is only possible through the support and input of an extensive network of volunteers throughout Merseyside and beyond. We need volunteers in the field and in the office, be it working directly with us, independently or via your own local groups. We need your help.

Year of the Environment Liverpool City Region

Year of the Environment 2019

Named in the recently published 25 Year Plan for the Environment1 by The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), 2019 will be a national 'Year of Green Action' for the UK. As part of this wider year the Liverpool City Region's Local Nature Partnership, Nature Connected, is taking the initiative and delivering a LCR focused Year of Action for the Environment. As an advisor on the environment and environmental issues to the Combined Authority the partnership is best placed to ensure our region meets both it's regulatory requirements and the expectations of the people of the Liverpool City Region in the context of rising concern and regard for the environment. This is the LCR Year of the Environment Mission Statement.

Rob Duffy: From the Library; Edward Wilson

Naturalist: Edward O. Wilson

EDWARD O. WILSON ( at 89) is one of the world’s renowned myrmecologists (studied ants) and has been an enthusiastic naturalist since the age of 7. Growing up in the Alabama swamplands, natural history kept him on an even keel through broken schooling, parental separation and his father’s suicide. Ensconced at Harvard, since the early 1950’s, he pioneered the exploration of New Guinea as an entomologist and developed the study of desert island re-colonisation in the Florida Keys.

Anthony Carter: Ravenmeols and Lifeboat Road

Geastrum schmidelii (Tiny Earthstar)

Sixteen members of North West Fungus Group attended on a beautiful autumn day. Our first foray since the area was taken over by The National Trust. First stop was at Ravenmeols where we checked on the decreasing patch of Tulostoma brumale. We also recorded some rarities in Hebeloma dunense and Inocybe dunensis, in the dunes (where else?).

Dr Phil Smith: Wildlife Notes October 2018

Fly Agaric (Dr Phil Smith)

After the great drought of 1976, the heavens opened in September and October of that year, rapidly replenishing ground-waters, rivers and other wetlands. In complete contrast, following this summer’s comparable drought, September 2018 was dry, while October was even worse, with measurable rain on only five days, a named storm on 13th producing the only really wet day. Average October rainfall for Formby is 84mm (3.3 inches); we probably had half that. This is important because, apart from impacts on farmers, gardeners, water-supply, etc., so much of our special duneland wildlife depends on recharge of the water-table to produce seasonally flooded slacks. Instead of rising in October, the water level dropped by about 3cm at the Devil’s Hole measuring point.

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